Posts Tagged "AAL Programme"

Call for posters at AAL Forum 2016

Call for posters at AAL Forum 2016

Are you involved in an interesting project or in an area of work that you would like to discuss with or show to other forum attendees? Why not present your work at the official poster session at the AAL Forum?  The poster session at the AAL Forum 2016 provides an opportunity to present latest results, on‐going research projects and innovative work in progress. Posters give authors and participants the chance to connect with each other and to engage in discussions about their work. They are also a fantastic way to present complex research concepts in a more accessible and easily digestible format. All accepted posters will be included in the AAL Forum poster section, which starts on 27 September. We ask all authors to be present at their posters so that they are available to discuss them further with participants. Presentation guidelines Pinboard size: 117cm x 148cm. Other formats will not be...

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AAL Forum 2016

AAL Forum 2016

St. Gallen, 26 – 28 September 2016   The AAL Forum is the annual showcase event for the people involved in the AAL Programme’s projects and the AAL community. Each year, it brings together policy makers, ICT developers, manufacturers, health professionals, commissioners, businesses, venture companies, technologists, academics, designers, carers and, of course, older adults, to come and see the latest developments in this exciting area of research. Innovation in this field is only in its infancy, but the steadily ageing global population means that it holds great commercial potential, evidenced by the increasing number of investors present at the event each year. See more at:...

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AAL Info Day 2016

AAL Info Day 2016

The AAL Association will organize  an INFO DAY on Tuesday, 8 March 2016 to inform the European community about the next call topic of the AAL Programme: “Living well with dementia – The contribution of ICT to integrated solutions for enabling the wellbeing of people living with dementia and their communities” People with dementia are confronted with a syndrome that increasingly affects their memory, thinking, behaviour and ability to perform everyday activities. The average duration of dementia is between 2 and 10 years and ranges from mild cognitive impairments to severe dementia. Dementia is overwhelming not only for the people who have it, but also for their caregivers and families and impacts them physically, psychologically and economically. Dementia is strongly linked with age. Existing treatments for neurodegenerative diseases are very limited and only treat the symptoms, rather than addressing the cause. In addition, no new drug treatment for Alzheimer’s disease has been approved in the past five years. This means that care and support to increasing numbers of people who have MCI/dementia, their carers and communities will be needed in the coming years. ICT technologies offer enormous potential to support not only people with dementia to live well, but also their families, informal carers and professional carers. The aim of this call is to support innovative, transnational and multi-disciplinary collaborative projects with a clear route to market and added-value for the different types of end-users. A key priority underlying this challenge will be to bring together technologies and services to create ICT based solutions with a clear route to market addressing the aspirations and challenges that will enable the wellbeing of people with dementia and their communities (family, caregivers, neighbourhood, service providers, care system, etc.). See more at:...

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Project Overview

Project Overview

The proliferation of various care services in most developed countries has led to a pressing demand for formal carers (such as paid workers, nurses and health professionals) and, in particular, informal carers (notably family members) who are nowadays the backbone of long-term care systems in most European countries and beyond. The informal carers role is very challenging, given that they have to deal with a variety of symptoms, treatments and care services, which span a wide range of illnesses, diseases, chronic conditions and health problems. Specifically, informal carers need to be able to understand the various conditions of elderly, patients and vulnerable individuals, while also possessing the knowledge and skills required to provide them support. At the same time informal carers are in need of psychological support in order to be able to cope with the psychological challenges of their role (i.e. the so called emotional labour) and perform their tasks in a sustainable...

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Overview

Overview

The proliferation of various care services in most developed countries has led to a pressing demand for formal carers (such as nurses and health professionals) and, in particular, informal carers (notably family members) who are nowadays the backbone of long-term care systems in most European countries and beyond. The informal carers role is very challenging, given that they have to deal with a variety of symptoms, treatments and care services, which span a wide range of illnesses, diseases, chronic conditions and health problems. Specifically, informal carers need to be able to understand the various conditions of elderly, patients and vulnerable individuals, while also possessing the knowledge and skills required to provide them support. At the same time informal carers are in need of psychological support in order to be able to cope with the psychological challenges of their role (i.e. the so called emotional labour) and perform their tasks in a sustainable way. EU and national long-term care policies acknowledge the role of informal carers and in several cases provide them incentives and financial benefits. However, there is still no adequate support to informal carers in terms of training towards improving their skills and alleviating their psychological stress. In response to these challenges, CarerSupport project will implement, deploy and test an integrated ICT platform enabling the participation and collaboration of informal carers, psychologists and health professionals towards facilitating the training, learning, orientation, and psychological support. In particular, the project will deploy and offer to informal carers: 1) Training, learning and orientation programmes, including general-purpose training programmes and programmes that emphasize on the carers’ digital skills. The former will include introductory blended-learning programmes emphasizing on the needs of elderly, and on how to plan and perform the most common care-related activities. The latter will enable carers to use and fully leverage ICT based solutions for active ageing and social inclusion, notably AAL solutions. 2) Psychological support services, aiming at alleviating the stress of informal carers, while at the same time providing them with emotional support. The scope of the support to be provided will include social support services, services facilitating carers to discharge their role, services alleviating stress and boosting mental health, as well as services that could minimize or eliminate smoking and drinking. The support to be provided will facilitate carers to deal with their own sorrow and sense of impending loss. The ICT platform of the project will support psychological services through appropriate on-line gaming activities, on-line tips and advice, quizzes, as well as educational activities assisting them in better planning and carrying out their tasks. 3) Collaboration services, which will emphasize communication and experience sharing between formal and informal carers. The main goal of these services will be to achieve knowledge transfer from experienced formal carers to the (usually) less experienced informal carers. As part of those services synchronous services for advise and handling/dealing with emergencies will be provided (e.g., in the form of a web-based 112 service for informal...

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AAL Programme

AAL Programme

The Ambient Assisted and Living (AAL) Programme is a funding activity running from 2008 to 2013, with the aim of enhancing the quality of life of older people and strengthening the industrial base in Europe through the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). Therefore, the AAL Programme is an activity that operates in the field of services and actions to enable the active ageing among the population. The programme is financed by the European Commission and the 22 countries that constitute the Partner States of this Joint Programme: Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. The AAL JP aims to combine social, technological and business aspects to deliver: New models of service delivery and care that contribute to greater self-reliance for older adults and greater support for informal carers; Adapted living spaces that can improve the quality of their everyday lives; New ways for older people to remain active, including contributing as volunteers or providing mutual support; New ways of mobilising active and trusted networks, both formal and informal, professional and in kind, to provide all types of support.   See more at:...

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